Docker

An open-source project for automating the deployment of applications as portable, self-sufficient containers that can run virtually anywhere on any type of server. Docker serves as a lightweight alternative to full machine virtualization provided by traditional hypervisors like VMware’s ESXi, Xen or KVM. Create image with Docker and deploy virtual machine as container. Upload it on docker hub for public access. Need orchestration tools to manage the containers.
There is an established certification program to make trusted, secure application containers supporting Docker and the Docker Engine, which should make it easier to deploy a uniform container environment over virtual hybrid clouds. A key benefit to the enterprise will be the establishment of common application lifecycle functions, such as security and certification, across distributed architectures, providing a level playing field for all container-based apps and services.

Virtualization & Containerization

Today’s OS virtualization technologies are primarily focused on providing a portable, reusable, and automatable way to package and run apps. The terms application container or simply container are frequently used to refer to these technologies. As the enterprise gravitates toward private clouds, particularly Linux-based clouds, an integrated container stack will be crucial for the delivery of applications and microservices to a diverse workforce. Containers are poised to emerge as an integral component of the cloud, which itself is on the way to dominating IT infrastructure both within and without the data center. Virtualization laid the groundwork for this transformation, but containers will kick it into the high-speed, highly diverse data environment that will propel data productivity for another generation.

DevOps

DevOps promotes a set of processes and methods for thinking about communication and collaboration – between departments of development, QA (quality assurance), and IT operations. In some organizations, this collaboration involves embedding IT operations specialists within software development teams, thus forming a cross-functional team – this may also be combined with matrix management.

Working: do it multi-thread but beware the wait flags. Do not wait approval to do great things. Patch even if not perfect, do not wait for approval, failure is good. Work as a reactive intelligent unit, not on automation pilot. Automation pilot is also when you are too organized!

“In response to a message that it receives, an actor can: make local decisions, create more actors, send more messages, and determine how to respond to the next message received. Actors may modify private state, but can only affect each other through messages (avoiding the need for any locks).”

On software development there are laws on design and productivity, one of it is Conway’s law, and others applicable from the natural world, others really counterintuitive.

Organizations which design systems … are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organizations.

— M. Conway

Corollary: organize your work, your teams, your organisation to work decoupled, decentralised in an unserialized way and feeling happy.